Signposts Along a Road of Bones: The US Fights International Climate and Migrations Action

First, from the weekend: 

KATOWICE, Poland—The United States worked with Russia and Saudi Arabia on Saturday night to sideline climate science in U.N. negotiations, angering nations that say urgent action is needed for their survival.

The three countries and Kuwait blocked nearly 200 nations involved in the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change from “welcoming” a U.N. report in October saying that “unprecedented” action is required to keep warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius and stave off worldwide hardship.

Vulnerable island nations and other developing countries tried to elevate the 1.5 C goals with the type of diplomatic subtlety these talks are known for. But welcoming the report was too strong a message for the United States and other nations that oppose climate action.

Scientific American

Then, from the week:

The first ever international deal on the migration crisis was signed on Monday by a majority of UN states, despite vociferous objections led by the United States.

The historic, non-binding global pact seeking to better manage migration was approved by delegates from 164 nations following 18 months of debate and negotiation. German chancellor Angela Merkel hailed it as an “important day”.

The UN’s global compact on safe, orderly and regular migration, signed in Marrakech, is aimed at coordinating action on migration around the world. It was rejected by President Donald Trump a year ago. Since then Austria, which holds the EU presidency, has pulled out of the process, along with Australia, Chile, the Czech Republic, Italy, Hungary, Poland, Latvia, Slovakia and the Dominican Republic.

The Guardian

(Since then, Brazil has also rejected the migration pact, though that might not be too surprising)

Neither one of these moves should cause too many monocles to shatter in shock. Republicans reject climate science, even when it is our own government and our own scientists projecting, with certainty, catastrophic and possibly civilization-ending results unless we act literally right now.  The President himself has said he doesn’t believe that climate report, because who knows who is paying these scientists, and anyway, he’s like a real smart guy. His uncle taught at MIT! 

(One could point out that it is the US government paying these scientists, something Trump could maybe have found out, except that he is a dim, conspiracy-addled doofus. This isn’t incidental to the whole thing.)

The migration compact, while in the long-run less absolutely catastrophic, also isn’t a surprise given the current state of our politics (and honestly, all but a few bright and shining times in our history of Chinese Exclusions and Operations Wetback). But it is also head-in-the-sand ignorance. The migration and refugee crisis is breaking the world as we know it, as people flee war and climate change and war worsened by climate change and environmental catastrophe exacerbated by war. You can’t hide from it. You can’t wish it away. It’s remaking politics across the globe. 

So why are they doing this? Well, if you want to be archly-cynical, you could say that they are right-wing supranationalists, and know that refugees and migrants can be useful to right-wing politicians, as they have been in countries like Poland, France, the US, Hungary, and the UK (and others). So stoking the crisis by doing nothing to help it aids in the ushering in of those governments. 

There’s an element of that, to be sure, but that’s too neat. It’s almost too smart. What it comes down to is paranoia and greed and short-sightedness, and the selfish and Randian idea that doing anything to help others, that sacrificing anything at all, is anathema to hyperbolic and rock-stupid ideals of masculinity and self-sufficiency. 

Look at the US’s “reasons” for pulling out of this pact. 

On Friday, the US described the pact as “an effort by the United Nations to advance global governance at the expense of the sovereign right of states”

The Guardian

This is an official statement. That’s paranoid, and it is cynical, but also sort of accurate in its extreme plugheadedness. It is correct around the margins, in that the UN recognizes that international crises, like the collapse of nations and the melting of the ice caps, demand international solutions.

That’s not easy, and really no country likes that. It’s part of human insanity. After all, how many current borders existed in their current form even 100 years ago? The United Kingdom? Japan? Australia, for sure, but even then it was part of the Empire. All over, we hold to new lines as if they were sacred truths, even as those lines are shown time and time again as fiction.

But of course, it’s taken to another level in America. It has to be twisted in American politics to mean “global governance”, a phrase redolent with tin foil and the staccato bursts and blurbs of some desert pirate radio frequency. It’s a phrase that should be only heard in dim warrens in strange cities, or at least in less-visited parts of the internet. 

But that’s who is in charge now. It would be the same if it was any Republican, but it has reached its oafish apex in Donald Trump, whose vanities and empty insecurities are a perfect match for the moment. He doesn’t believe in climate change because he doesn’t understand it and doesn’t like when people show off by being smarter than him. He doesn’t want to help solve the migration crisis because that means being nice to non-white people who might not like him, personally. He doesn’t like international solutions to things because that means there were negotiations made without the solo force of his unique genius. 

Policy-wise, there is little difference between him and, say, Marco Rubio, who would have stuttered some nonsense about “waiting to see some scientific consensus, and also Bible.” But Trump’s raving paranoia and his absolute certainty that he has nothing to learn, coupled with his quivering fear of knowledge, lend this pivotal moment an absolute carny garishness. 

The world is burning and melting; it is flooding and desiccating. Jellyfish are taking over anoxic oceans. And we are being ruled by nitwits, whose corruption and illegitimacy are reduced to bitter punchlines in the face of such disaster. This is the worst possible moment to have such people in charge. Our last chance is here, and we’re running away from it.  

Advertisements

Wisconsin and Amazon: America’s Slide into Dystopia


Left unsaid by Robin Vos, Speaker of the Wisconsin Assembly, is that this “very liberal governor” was elected because of his beliefs, not despite them. But really, he didn’t need to say it. Tony Evers defeated Scott Walker, and the Republicans of Wisconsin decided they didn’t like that. In direct contravention of the explicit wishes of their state’s voters, they stripped the incoming governor and attorney general of an extraordinary amount of power, giving it back to the legislature, which remained in Republican hands despite them losing the popular vote. 

It’s left unsaid because the Republican Party of Wisconsin barely even pretends to care about democracy anymore. Outside of perhaps North Carolina, they have been the most aggressive about gerrymandering in an attempt to solidify minority rule over the last decade.

It’s naked and blatant and barely even pays tribute to virtue. Vos talks about how it’s a check on an executive power and how he is worried about Evers running roughshod over the state, but that’s obvious transparent bullshit, a cynicism to which even Mitch McConnell would tip his hat. If you imagine they’d have been similarly concerned about executive power had Walker been re-elected, I have a bridge to Washington Island for you to invest in. 

OK, but what powers is Evers losing to this not-at-all by chance tinkering? 

The Republican-controlled state Legislature has approved new limits on the power of Democratic Gov.-elect Tony Evers in a lame-duck session, including his ability to keep a campaign promise to remove Wisconsin from a multi-state lawsuit challenging the Affordable Care Act.
Following overnight debate, lawmakers voted early Wednesday morning on that measure. The bill would also limit early voting in Wisconsin and give state lawmakers more power over the state’s economic development agency, which Evers has said he would like to eliminate

Wisconsin Public Radio (link above)

That’s the Republican vision of America in a nutshell, isn’t it?

  • Make sure that health care is a privilege of the lucky, and even most of them are at the mercy of fortune and the dubious beneficence of the marketplace. Human immiseration is the goal here
  • Continue to push huge corporate giveaways at the expense of the environment, solidifying private control over the land. The Foxconn scam is just the most blatant example here. Walker and the legislature have used the agency to undermine the state’s land and wildlife protection, allowing companies to ruin what makes Wisconsin great, without even giving a few alms to its actual citizens. That’s the whole programs: everything should be turned into capital. 
  • Limit voting as much as humanly possible in order to cement Republican rule, so that they can continue to do the above. 

You want an example of how this future looks? As you probably know, on Wednesday, the USPS was closed to honor George HW Bush. I think it’s obscene we do this for presidents. I feel this was for any president, not just HW, he of the Complicated Legacy.  The whole state pageantry, the “Day of Mourning”, the shutting down of institutions: none of it seems like a democracy or a tribute fitting the elected head of the executive branch. It’s like we still long for god-kings. 

And in a way, we do, because while the USPS was shut down, it wasn’t shut down entirely

Services and offices across the country are closed or suspended Wednesday in honor of former President George H.W. Bush’s funeral.

With a National Day of Mourning declared by President Donald Trump, everything from the federal government to the stock market will not be operating today. But while the U.S. Postal Service is observing the day by closing post offices and not delivering regular mail, there is at least one exception: Amazon orders.

USPS explained in a Monday statement that it would “provide limited package delivery service on that day to ensure that our network remains fluid.” It added that these packages would be delivered to avoid “negatively affect[ing] our customers or business partners during the remainder of our busy holiday season.”

And I get that. Amazon ships about 1.6 million packages a day, probably a lot more during the holiday season. To stop that for a day would cause chaos. But it would also make Amazon look bad, because people would get their packages a whole day later. 

So think about that: the insane mournful pageantry of a State Funeral, in which we weep and moan and all our public officials are in ashes and sackcloth is only interrupted by the grinding wheels of commerce, but a company that wrecks its workers and bends cities to its will and crushes independence in a manifestation of perfect capitalism. 

The Amazon model, in which the obscenely wealthy can control ogvernments and bend the wheels of state to their wills while crushing worker rights and ignoring environmental legislation, is not just a GOP thing. But while Democrats are too often in thrall to preeningly bloodless Silicon Valley chumps, the idea of a capitalist dystopia is the number one goal of the Republican Party. Enacting it is why Wisconsin Republicans are doing what they are doing. Their stated goals aren’t even trying to pretend otherwise. 

As climate change continues to make lives worse for the non-rich, this trend could accelerate. We’re not ready for the dual shocks of automation and climate change, and if we keep cedeing power to the wealthy, it’ll get worse. The Republicans have revealed in full their program. It’s up to the rest of us to stop them. 

The Memory of George Bush is the Myth of America

A rich, complicated man

If you were Very Online over the weekend, by early Saturday morning you had already glassed over every possible take on the passing of George Herbert Walker Bush: patriarch of America’s most prominent Republican family, congressman, CIA head, Veep, POTUS, statesman, symbol of a better time. 

You probably also read that he was a race-baiting war criminal whose phony War on Drugs condemned hundreds of thousands of mostly poor minorities to rot in jail, who helped pave the way for the destruction of Roe, and who deliberately fiddled while the AIDS crisis burned. 

You heard how he was a statesman whose cool head and WWII-born desire to protect the international order helped bring a mostly-peaceful end to the Cold War. You heard how he was a genuine liberal internationalist, a man who saw the horrors of war, was a true hero, and who spent a lifetime making sure that never happened again. 

You also may have heard (although this weirdly is never mentioned) how he invaded Panama for no good reason, continuing a century of violent colonialism in Latin America. Maybe you also heard how he approved bombing on the Highway of Death in Iraq, an absolute cravenly and brutal war crime. 

Oh! He also abandoned the Kurds and the Shi’ites to their fate after encouraging the to rise up against Saddam. And he also gracefully ceded the stage after losing his election, becoming friends with Bill Clinton, and showing us that politics doesn’t have to be so rough. 

That’s where we are. Actions against actions, perceptions against perceptions. Some of the perceptions are high-blown idiocies, of course: politics is inherently personal unless you are sheltered from their effects; Bush’s DEA entrapped a kid with no record so that Bush could hold up a bag of crack on the TV.  

The rich doyens of the media and the consulting class have spent a weekend pining for the days when we didn’t take things so darn personally, and when gracious patricians like George Bush the Older showed us a better path. 

That is pernicious bullshit, of course. Politics matters. Health care and welfare aren’t a debate between Paul Ryan and Steny Hoyer or whatever: they are a matter of life and death for people. The myth of George HW Bush is that this stuff doesn’t matter, that we can just reach across the aisle and find middle ground, which always results in screwing over the non-rich. 

That was Bush’s career. He rose to prominence by running a race-baiting campaign against Richard Yarborough, a true GOP lion on Civil Rights. He consistently sold out his principles on women’s reproductive rights in order to win over the evangelical base, going to far as to appoint Clarence Thomas to the Supreme Court (which had the double-pleasure of letting conservatives sneer “What are you complaining about? We appointed a black guy!”). And of course, Mr. Gracious Politics Should Be Nice ran the Willie Horton ad implying that if Mike Dukakis won your wife would be raped by a black felon. 

This stuff matters. His War on Drugs mattered. His kissing up to the Evangelicals mattered (that it was unsuccessful for him doesn’t mean it was any less empowering for them). George Bush, in his race-baiting, in his trolling, in his indifference to the suffering of the wrong people, didn’t just help set up today’s GOP; he was a major part of it. 

But…he also believed in civic service. He also believed in family (his, anyway). He also believed strongly that the world should be bound by treaty and institution to avoid the horrors of WWII. He was a man who understood the world and studied it deeply, far more than could be said of his son or, god knows, Trump. In the second half of the 20th century and beyond, he was certainly the finest Republican president, and a man who helped make the world peaceful. 

So what does this mean? It’s not any bullshit like “he was a complicated man!” He was, and he wasn’t, like everyone else. It means, perhaps, that you can be a decent President even if you are a race-hustling war criminal. Which means that being a race-hustling war criminal is built into America. It’s baked into the job of being President, but it is also who we are. 

America has always been a country that has sided with the powerful against its workers. It’s always been a country where racism works (see: Stacy Abrams, for example). For the last century it’s been a country that throws smaller countries against the wall. We’re a nation dictated and determined by the absolute dictates of capitalism, which is inherently violent and cruel. 

That we are also a nation that fights against this is inspiring. That we are a nation where labor leaders, civil rights leaders, LGBTW leaders, and so many more try to take from the powerful what we deserve is inspiring. It isn’t uniquely American, but there is an American ferver. That’s cool, and that’s why this stuff matters. 

Our politics is based around violence, both physical and statutory. George Bush was part of that. That’s why the myth of decency is inherently indecent, an insult to what we’re still fighting for and fighting against. George Bush was a fine American President. The job of the future is to change what that means. 

McRaven and Saudi Statement: Trumpism in Full (UPDATED)

It’s difficult to say what might be the most craven and sickening moment of the week (it is Wednesday at 7:00am as I write this; there is still a lot of time for more cravenness). 

Was it Trump’s Fox-addled, conspiratorial, and self-serving statement on Admiral McRaven, which was somehow only two days ago?

This is a strong contender, because it makes clear that Trump’s admiration of anything, even of Navy goddamn Seals, is contingent upon their praise. In his logic, criticism of him by one of the most respected warriors of his generation isn’t a cause for reflection, but an imputation of conspiracy and a chance to lash out. 

That’s not new, of course. We knew this. We know that Trump can’t see anything past his own self-interest. What’s always nice to see, though, is that the official GOP is fully in his corner, even after a true electoral nutstomping, even when he is attacking the people who killed Osama bin Laden.

Worth noting! It’s also worth noting, of course, that he was on the Trump transition team’s short list for NatSec posts. Being on a short list doesn’t mean anything, except that you are respected by just about everyone. That McRaven has been critical of Trump since he first started lowing his ugly dirges in 2016 isn’t a sign that McRaven is political or partisan, but that his patriotism demanded an extraordinary response to an extraordinary threat. 

And this threat won, and continues to pervert our politics. GOP fealty to that seems unshakable. And while I obviously don’t expect the party to criticize the President over Twitter, they are under no obligation to continue an attack on McRaven. That they choose to do so demonstrates once again, and hopefully forever, that protecting Trump’s ego and interest tops every other consideration of decency or even political rationale. 

But of course, the real low point of the week came yesterday, in the insane, childish, clinically dishonest, and deeply amoral statement in which the White House washed their hands and the hands of Mohammed bin Salman over the murder of Jamal Khashoggi. 

OK. 

First off, this was clearly dictated by the President, if not actually typed out by him. It probably wasn’t typed, since there aren’t really any typos or anything. It starts with two exclamation points, the first being the old fascist slogan which Trump has adopted, even though by now he surely knows its provenance. That he keeps it is because he wants to do so. When someone says they are a Nazi, they are. 

What is perhaps more insane is the second one: “The world is a dangerous place!” I know that Trump believes he is telling us a hard truth here, but for a President to imagine that to be some kind of bold statement just shows his insane self-absorption and his need to be a tough guy. Only he is brave enough to say that the world is dangerous. 

But then the immorality and dishonesty really sets in. While Iran is no innocent in Yemen, it is completely wrong to say that they are responsible for the “bloody proxy war” in Yemen. Even just using that phrase “proxy war” implies guilt on both sides, as it takes two to proxy. But that’s a phrase Trump clearly heard once or twice, and thinks it makes him sounds all military-like. 

(UPDATE: Greg Johnsen has a great piece on Just Security absolutely refuting this particular lie, with a year-by-year detailing of Iran and KSA’s involvement in Yemen)

The idea that Saudi Arabia would love to pull out of Yemen if only Iran would is blistering nonsense, and shows someone who has either been easily convinced by MBS’s half-baked lies or has decided to invent lies of his own, out of whole cloth. Saudi would do nothing of the sort

For Trump to even pretend to be concerned about Yemen is stomach-turning, as he’s given Saudi Arabia carte blanche to do whatever they want inside that broken and shattering land. But that’s the point of this statement: Saudi Arabia, and MBS, can do whatever they want no matter what. 

In some ways that’s nothing new; US foreign policy has been unduly influenced by Saudi Arabia since WWII. But there have been no statements as cravenly and openly immoral as this one, in which the President dismisses his own intelligence agencies in order to declare the US indifferent to slaughter, whether it is the personal and gruesome slaughter of a dissident journalist residing in the US or the wholesale slaughter of a nation. 

It’s hardly worth saying that none of this is true, of course (or to ask what a “heavily negotiated trip” is). The money isn’t accurate, the contracts aren’t really contracts, and the idea that it will create “hundreds of thousands” of jobs is so preposterous that it in and of itself is grounds for invoking the 25th Amendment, if just on the basis of sheer contempt for the public. 

But, as has been discussed, this completely inverts the idea of leverage. We have what the Saudis want and need. They can’t actually switch to Russia and China; that would take decades. The US has the power here. But we have ceded it to Saudi Arabia. 

Why we have done so is and isn’t a mystery. Obviously, the US has never been a particularly moral country, feeling free to look the other way or to openly abet murder and abuse. In a way, this is a continuation. But never before have we been so open about a price; never before have we subsumed every aspect of our foreign policy to the whims and needs of one man. 

I don’t know if Trump is personally in hock to the House of Saud, or if he depends on them for business. It’s very possible; he’s an grubby conman who always needs a source of easy cash, and rich immoral regimes enjoy that. And they enjoy having leverage over the President. It’s weird, I know. It does seem clear that Kushner is heavily over-leveraged and deeply dependent on Saudi money, which explains why MBS so gleefully cultivates this callow know-nothing. But it is unclear as to whether Kush has any influence anymore. 

And while we do know that, from a neocon point-of-view, Saudi Arabia=Good because Iran=Bad, and having them as an ally is part of a scheme both grandiose and vague, we know that Trump isn’t truly motivated by any grand plans. He’s only motivated by self-interest. 

Everything that happened this week is a result of his narcissism, his inability to take criticism, his constant need for praise, his pathological dishonesty, and his existence as both a conman and the easiest fucking mark on the planet. Since he only understands transactions, he is easily bought, and finds everything easy to sell. From rubbery steaks to any moral or actual foreign policy leverage, he’ll put it on the market if the buyer makes him feel special. 

That’s who our President is. And despite some mewls of protestation from the GOP, until they decide to actually do anything, they are continuing to cede our country to his darkly mirrored vision. If their “resistance” can be summed up, it has to be done by Lindsay Graham. 

If anyone knows about losing their moral voice, it’s Graham. 

Paul Ryan Condemns Yemen as Going-Away Present

Christ, what an asshole

In the end, there wasn’t much question about them doing the right thing. If for some reason we naively wondered what the outgoing Republican majority would do before the door hit them on the ass, it is now clear: consolidate and ruin as much as possible. Under the leadership of Paul Ryan, who is the worst, misery and destruction has been their animating principle for years now; why would it change? 

They didn’t start with taxes or women’s rights or reversing the Americans with Disability Act or anything, though. They decided to maximize cruelty by letting Saudi Arabia reap unchecked through Yemen for at least two more months. 

Almost all Republicans and a handful of Democrats voted with Ryan to strip privilege from a bill endorsed by top Democrats that would have ended U.S. support for the Saudis and their allies in the four-year civil war in Yemen. Without privilege, the House leadership can ignore the bill. In other words, it’s now almost certain that the House won’t deal with the legislation ― and, more broadly, the conflict itself ― until Democrats take charge next year.

Huffington Post

It isn’t that things would change dramatically over the next couple of months, least of all for Yemen. The grinding conflict would continue. Even if Saudi Arabia was suddenly forced to cease all military actions (which they wouldn’t), the internal fighting, which is the real show, would carry on. 

And even if the fighting somehow miraculously ended, if a show of resolution by the US Congress would convince enemies to lay down arms and take up bread (it wouldn’t), the truth remains that there is no bread. The famine would continue. Disease would continue to spread. Barring a massive international effort to save the nation, there would be little material difference. 

Why Ryan’s Actions Matter

So what difference does it make? How is this more important than just garden-variety GOP sociopathy? 

It matters because it clearly signals to MBS that the Republican Party intends to let him continue his war, because Saudi Arabia has joined Russia and Israel as conservative totem countries, which is really weird, though it makes sense (they are all led by pseudo-macho right-wing authoritarian religious bigots). It is also a signal that Trump won’t really do anything to interfere, though anyone who thinks there is a “clear signal” involving Trump is a fool. 

(Which, incidentally, MBS might be. In a stroke of luck, his appointed Prosecutor found that his agents are responsible for the murder of Khashoggi, and is recommending the death penalty for five of them. Demonstrating your willingness to blame and then kill your henchmen is not exactly a guarantor of regime stability! 

It’s true that the Democrats have made ending US involvement in this war one of their top priorities. Nancy Pelosi (who better be the Speaker, dammit) has made it clear that she intends to strip funding. There is enough of a Dem majority to make this happen. 

It’s unclear what will happen next. Absent help from the White House, this might be meaningless. It’s very possible the admin and the Pentagon will simply ignore Congress. It’s happened before, and we live in a time where such an action would be met largely with shrugs. It’s also true the US could help perpetuate the war indirectly. There’s no end to indifferent venality. 

But, at the very least, the delay by Ryan gives Saudi Arabia time. It gives him at least a few more months to consolidate gains, which will almost certainly ramp up Yemen’s misery as we move toward our holidays. It seems the only war that Paul Ryan and the GOP think brings actual suffering is the War on Christmas. May they all rot in hell. 

History, Cont.

So, there’s a lot going on here.

First, of course, is the rueful and mirthlessly gobsmacked chuckle that comes thinking about Trump putting his great brain into high gear. There is no doubt he thinks he’s making a hell of a gotcha here, that France maybe forgot they fought Germany in the wars, but that he, Trump, who knows history maybe better than anyone, reminded them. Checkmate, Pierre!

There are a lot of things to say about this, primarily that Macron probably didn’t forget the war, since he was at the goddamn memorial services Trump skipped out on. But there is actually something more interesting going on here, and it is the heart of Trump’s fallacy.

The central idiocy of this tweet, of course, is that Trump is saying that Macron shouldn’t want a European defense league in case Germany tries to get rowdy again, which is weird, since Germany would be part of that league. In theory, this could make sense: the post-war order was designed to, essentially, curb German ambitions by integrating it fully into the Western alliances. If that world order crumbled, Germany could become aggressive again, and turn its eyes across the Rhine.

So there is a kernel of sense in what Trump is saying. And it is true the huge bulk of NATO’s budget comes from the US…but that’s because the US benefits enormously from NATO. And, more to the point, Trump is not trying to defend NATO. He’s trying to destroy it. He’s trying to destroy every Western alliance.

That to me is the point of what Macron is doing. The US is openly trying to get out of the alignments that have been a primary reason why the Rhine has gone uncrossed for 70 years. Macron is trying to protect that order, and if he can’t, find a system to replace it.

Macron clearly remembers the lessons of the wars; that’s why he is desperately trying to find a way to maintain some system to keep that in place. He sees Merkel is stepping down, the UK is caught up in Brexit, countries like Poland and Hungary have been taken over by far-right anti-democratic parties and charismatic psuedo-populists, that Austria and Greece have their own issues with fascism, and that he barely staved off a right-wing anti-modernity force of his own.

That’s the interesting thing about Macron. His corporatist-wienie techno-optimist venture-capital-suited bloodlessness is, I think, tempered by the knowledge that none of this has truly made a new Europe. It hasn’t made Western civilization peaceful or truly pushed us past the centuries of fighting that ravaged the continent. He seems to know that this is a blip, and that 70 years of peace is nothing compared to the hundreds of years of war that preceded it.  He seems like a man who has realized his treasured philosophies won’t beat back the demons of nationalism and blood.

This isn’t to say he’s a hero; he still seems to lean toward a jargony b-school style of politics. It’s that he knows this moment is dire. Angela Merkel knows it too. They don’t need history lessons from a barely-literate old sofa of a President; they certainly don’t need those lectures from someone who is trying to destroy the system that has kept their countries at peace.

It’s a sign of how much we’ve gotten used to the insanity of the Trump era that this tweet it taken largely in stride. I am sure that Macron and Merkel are now just shaking their heads. The President of the United States is openly trying to break of NATO unless he can run it as an extortionary wing while undermining everything it purportedly stands for, skipping out on meetings with our allies but giving his cheesiest jabroni grin at the man squeezing Europe from the East.

Image result for trump putin france

He seems genuinely happy. 

This would be a diplomatic scandal in any other time, and would scream across headlines around the world. But how can there be a scandal? How can there be malpractice when the patient is already dead? Trump has made it very clear what he actually thinks about the alliance. He wants it gone so that he can play big power politics unconstrained by any norms.

It’s not so much philosophical as it is instinctual and narcissistic: no one can tell him what to do; no one can make better deals. That his grotesque pathologies match up with this terrible authoritarian moment isn’t exactly a coincidence- the world has been moving toward his oafish cruelty for a few decades, much as American politics has lined up with his dimwit vanities- but it is good luck for other authoritarians.

There are leaders who understand the sweep of history and work to sweep it the other way. Then there are leaders who understand history and use it to their bloody ends. Then there are leaders who only understand themselves, who only see things through the spectrum of their own glory, and who will reap their gluttonous way around the globe if it will satisfy some deep pathological itch. Right now the latter is the most powerful person in the world.

It’s a cruel and needed reminder that we don’t get to live outside of history. We just have to try to see it while we’re in it.